Hinterberger Panorama Trail - Station Singerhauserhütte

Bad Mitterndorf, Steiermark, Österreich

The route runs across the Hinterbergertal valley along the sunny Höhenweg, from Kainisch/Radling, via Knoppen, Obersdorf, Singerhauserhütte, via the Simonywarte and Brentenmöser-Alm to the Bergeralm and on to Tauplitz. Along the route, information boards provide interesting facts about the nature, culture and history of the valley.

Historical ore mining at the Röthelstein and the Teltschenalm
(> View direction Kampl and Teltschenalm)

In order to supply the hammer mill in Grubegg (ca. 1800 - 1850) in the south of Mitterndorf with iron, the salt works administration considered mining ore deposits on the Röthelstein and the Telt-schenalm. Various deposits were suspected, not only ore, but also coal and salt. The traditional use of saline springs and small salt deposits in the Hinter-bergertal was well known. In 1783, the Aussee salt works administration had coal and iron mined. Systematic exploitation began in 1797. However, a smelting plant built for this purpose suffered from a lack of wood for coal production. Investigations and test digging revealed that the ore was not of high enough quality. Due to the location and the altitude, there was a transport problem, and mining could only take place in summer. For this reason, the saltworks stopped prospecting in 1808. After another attempt 30 years later, the saltworks finally stopped mining ore in 1853. Since it was too expensive to use the accumulated ore reserves, they are still lying on the heaps today.


Alpine farming

Until the 19th century, alpine pasture farming played a special role in the farming economy of the Enns Valley and the Salzkammergut, as it did in Alpine regions in general: in the Hinterberger Valley, too, the valley floors consisted mainly of moorland and could hardly be used for agriculture. Alpine pastures were therefore an indispensable basis as fodder for the cattle. The historical alpine pasture farming is reflected in the Enns Valley and the Salzkammergut in a large number of alpine pastures that are now closed down. Historical descriptions show how great the importance of alpine farming was. At the time of Maria Theresa, there is evidence of eight low mountain pastures and 13 high mountain pastures in the Mitterndorf basin with a total of 142 huts for the keeping of 931 cattle. In his historical-topographical survey of the Duchy of Styria in 1843, Georg Göth, the secretary of Archduke Johann, named a significant number of cattle pastures for the tax municipalities of Mitterndorf and Pichl, most of which are no longer used for alpine farming today, for example the Raß, Mitter, Fahrnrin, Rothmoos, Teltschen, Zlaim, Rechentrett, Klausgraben, Schwarzacker, Riesen and Laueralpe. In the 19th century, alpine pasture farming experienced a significant decline due to the onset of industrialisation and the draining of the valley floors. The conversion of dairy farming to dairies and the increasing importance of hunting also played a role.


Winter carriage & lumberjacks

About 100 years ago, apart from agriculture, Mitterndorf was a woodworking landscape. A part of the employed male population worked in forestry, timber transport and wood processing. Winter haulage was an important sideline for farmers. After the Second World War, the timber and forestry industry changed radically. The use of horses to transport timber, which was still common in the 1950s and 1960s, came to an end in the 1970s. That generation that worked in forestry after 1945 experienced the radical change from manual woodworking to power saws, from draft horses and wood sledges to forest roads, tractors and trucks. With this change, the long tradition of lumberjacks and winter hauling finally came to an end. It was a world of work that was remembered by those involved at the time as both hard and demanding work and a special community experience.


First mention of the name "Mitterndorf

For the first margraves of Styria (the Traungauers or "Otokars"), the Palatinate of Pürgg, which in the Middle Ages bore the name "Grauscharn", was an important centre of power. Grauscharn controlled the Enns valley and the connection to the Ausseerland with its salt deposits and subsequently also became the seat of a powerful parish situated north of the Enns. This is when the direct administration of the Ausseerland and the Hinterbergertal began. In 1147, the Traungau and Styrian Margrave Otokar III gave the newly founded Cistercian monastery of Rein a salt mining site on the Sandling and several farmsteads for agricultural use, including two farmsteads in "Mittelindorf". Mitterndorf was first mentioned in writing in this document. This donation marked the beginning of the rise of salt mining in Aussee.


When "Hinterberg" came into being

After the last Babenbergs died out (first half of the 13th century), the rulers in Styria changed several times in the struggle for their inheritance. In 1254, Archbishop Philipp von Sponheim of Salzburg occupied the Enns Valley and the Ausseerland. He had the Pflindsburg built, the castle that gave the Ausseerland its lordship name for a long time (Pflindsberg). From this period of brief Bohemian rule over Styria comes an Urbar (tax register) of Styrian sovereign property from the year 1265, in which the name Hinterberg is mentioned in a document for the first time, the name of which comes from the superior county of Ennstal. Hinterberg refers to the sovereign lordship between Kainisch and Kulm, which was administered from Aussee together with the lordship of Pflindsberg (today the Ausseerland communities) and existed like all the lordships until 1848. Tauplitz, on the other hand, belonged to the parish of Pürgg or the lordship of Trautenfels.

Travelling by public transport
Route planner for independent travellers
  • Hiking
General price information

The Hinterberg Panorama Trail can be hiked free of charge.

We wish you much pleasure!

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Contact


Hinterberger Panorama Trail - Station Singerhauserhütte
Nr. 287
8983 Bad Mitterndorf

mobile +43 660 8171950
E-Maild.pichlmayer@gmx.at
Webwww.singerhauserhuette.com
http://www.singerhauserhuette.com

Contact person
Family Rudolf Pichlmayer
Singerhauserhütte
Nr. 287
8983 Bad Mitterndorf

mobile +43 660 8171950
E-Maild.pichlmayer@gmx.at
Webwww.singerhauserhuette.com

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